Vocation

What is a Vocation?

A religious vocation is a special gift and call from God that is received in faith and cultivated and discerned in prayer.

Please click on the following links to learn more below!

Understanding God’s Call

Discerning Your Vocation

Types of Vocation

Vocation Stories

 

Understanding God’s Call

 

Through baptism God calls us all to follow Christ. Calls us to live according to the Gospel. Calls us to be holy. People respond to this call in many different ways. Some people follow this calling through religious life.

Such a call may come as a sense of longing for something more; a desire to commit one’s life completely to Christ; wanting to be of service to others in and through the Church; a suggestion or invitation from another. God’s call to each of us is as personal and individual as we are, but it is always a call to love, to freedom, to fullness of life.

“I have loved you with an everlasting love therefore I have called you.”

Jeremiah 31

The Lord has a plan for each of us; he calls each one of us by name. Our task is to learn how to listen, to perceive his call, to be courageous and faithful in following him and, when all is said and done, to be found trustworthy servants who have used well the gifts given us.

Pope Benedict XVI

Discerning Your Vocation

“I think I may have a vocation to religious life but I don’t know what to do?”

We suggest the following:

  • Pray to God for guidance.
  • Enquire about the different Religious Orders, their charism, their work and their spirit. You can write, visit their websites or email to get information.
  • Reflect on your own gifts and abilities and how they might guide your choice of religious community.
  • Talk to someone, a friend who knows you well; a religious sister, priest or brother that you know, or take time to get guidance from a spiritual director.
  • Contact the Vocation Directors of the communities that appeal to you. They are trained to help you in your discernment process.
  • Remember discerment can take some time, so there is no need to be anxious, you are simply trying to find out where God might be calling you.

Contact:
Vocations Ireland
St Mary’s Centre
Fitzwilliam House
185-201 Merrion Road
Dublin D04 NX60

Telephone: 01 260 3707
Mobile: 086 782 0149

If you wish to contact us for more information or further advice, you can send us a message via the form below, please include your name and email address.

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To find a Spiritual Director

Types of Vocation

Religious Brothers:

Are communities of professed religious men with vows of poverty, celibate chastity and obedience who devote their lives to God through teaching, nursing and the care of the less privileged members of society.

Religious Sisters:

Are communities of professed religious women with vows of poverty, celibate chastity and obedience. They devote themselves to following Christ and serving God in a whole range of ministries. Teaching, nursing, pastoral ministry and social work for the poor and deprived.

Religious Priests:

Are communities of ordained, professed men with vows of poverty, celibate chastity and obedience who devote themselves to following Christ and serving God’s people in the Church. They do this through various ministries, preaching, teaching, parish ministry, retreat work, chaplaincies, social and youth work. Some orders also have non-ordained, professed members as brothers.

Missionary Societies:

Are communities of ordained men pledged to their society who follow Christ and serve God through missionary activity abroad.

Missionary Sisters:

Are communities of professed women with vows of poverty, celibate chastity and obedience who devote themselves to following Christ and to serving God’s people on the missions.

Contemplative Monks:

Are communities of ordained and non-ordained professed men with vows of poverty, celibate chastity, obedience and stability. They pray the Liturgy of the Hours, celebrate daily Eucharist and devote their lives to contemplation and manual work.

Contemplative Sisters:

Are communities of professed women with vows of poverty, celibate chastity, obedience and stability. They pray the Liturgy of the Hours, have daily Eucharist and devote their lives to contemplation and manual work.

Secular Institutes:

Secular institutes are a form of consecrated life in which members live a life of celibate chastity, poverty and obedience. Members live their commitment through the witness of their Christian lives and their apostolic activity wherever they are employed. Through their consecration they try to be a leaven in society. Generally members live alone or with their families.

Secular institutes are for laywomen, Laymen and for diocesan priests. Periodically, members of respective institutes come together for retreats, meetings and renewal that are expressive of their union.

Vocation Stories

New Postulants Enter Carmel

New Postulants Enter Carmel

On January 1, 2019, Feast of the Nativity of Mary, four young women joined the Carmelite Sisters and became the newest members of the Congregation!  The Entrance Ceremony was held at Saint Teresa's Chapel of the Motherhouse in Germantown, New York and was presided by...

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Sr Marie Dunne

Sr Marie Dunne

At 10 years of age, I wrote an essay to say that I wanted to be a Holy Faith Sister – I had forgotten all about it until it was given back to me 16 years later! I had been an only girl in my family for 14 years, and I was very shy, so my mother signed me up for a club...

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Sr Mary Usifoh OLA shares her story with Vocations Ireland

Sr Mary Usifoh OLA shares her story with Vocations Ireland

Profile:Sr Mary Usifoh Sr Mary Usifoh is from the resource-rich Delta State in southern Nigeria which is largely defined by the great Niger River. The river straddles Delta State’s eastern fringes, gifting farmers with abundant quantities of fertile agricultural...

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Brother Sean Kelly

Brother Sean Kelly

Capuchin Franciscans I was very naive in that I was half expecting God to give me a call, if not in a clap of thunder, the least he could afford me was a gentle whisper. Well he did call but not in the way I expected. I now know that he choose the timefor me to be...

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Julie Buckley

Julie Buckley

Sisters of Marie Reparatrice After finishing school, I trained as a nurse and later as a midwife. I gave up practicing my faith and enjoyed a busy social life. Over time tough, I experienced a growing emptiness and dissatisfaction with my life, which no socializing...

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